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pennsylvania. a whole issue of voter suppression and having been in charlotte, a great civil-rights city, where the students from the historical black college in 1960 set up a lunch counter in to grant them and yet, what do we see today? state after state, efforts to suppress voting rights instead of expanding them. not enough people vote in this country. in pennsylvania, there is legislation now on the books that could disenfranchise between 750,000-1 million people. president obama won by 600,000 boats in pennsylvania last time. this really does determine the election. i don't care who you are for. this will determine the election. it is a huge problem or the country. we should be celebrating voters going to the polls, not putting impediments in their way. host: the radio program "democracy now" turns 25 this year? guest: we started in 1996. we were just on radio. the week of september 11, 2001, we started on the first television station in new york city on public access. then it just caught on like wildfire beyond the election and more television stations aired us and radio stations and npr
's great to be with you. host: you are in the midst of a 100-city tour that you tell me is running through election day. where are you at this point in the tour, and how many more cities do you have? guest: well, i think i'm at c-span right now, although it is a little confusing. last night i was at the university of virginia in charlingtsville. today we'll be at the washington convention center, the green fest tonight. baltimore book fest. tomorrow, richmond, virginia, at noon. and then in the evening i'll speak in norfolk. then on monday night, we'll be at virginia tech, which is very interesting, going back to the scene of the massacre. i'll be speaking there, you know, 32 people were killed there. and colin goddard is coming with us. he was one of those victims. he was shot four times. i'm also looking forward to interviewing a professor there. and then we're on to colorado for the big debate. we're going to be doing something interesting. we're both speaking on the silent majority election 2012 tour, but also we do this daily, radio and television broadcast that airs on over 1,100 sta
is not based on any big city in milwaukee, so he could pretty much say what he wanted and his constituency did not watch c-span. they did not really know the guy. but they know him now. warm hughere's no there. i'm in the age group where it will not affect me if he puts his plan. but i do have done a siblings. my husband has done a siblings and it will affect them. they're in their '40's. one more call from j.c. in missouri, a republican. caller: i want ryan to be vice president. he is going to support mitt romney very good. we have to remember they are christians an. we are going to take back america. we are responsible, because you look at the president and the vice-president, the vice president is not helping the jewish people. the president is putting us in debt. our grandkids will not come out of this. host: thanks for the 25 calls. after all that, there is this tweet -- that's the end of that segment. coming up next, jess bravin will join us for the opening of the supreme court term, which starts today, which cases will be at the top of the dogged and what the teams will be. -- the top o
of the cities where he worked, meeting as many people as he could, speaking arabic, listening with a broad smile. chris went to benghazi in the early days of the libyan revolution, a riding on a cargo ship. as america's representative, we helped the libyan people. as they cared for the wounded, and crafted a vision in which the rights of all libyans would be respected. libyans held elections and built new institutions. and began to move forward after decades of dictatorship. chris stevens loved his work. he took pride in the country he served. he saw dignity in the people that he met. two weeks ago he traveled to benghazi to review plans to establish a new cultural center and modernize a hospital. that is one of america's compound came under attack. along with three of his colleagues, chris was killed, in the city he helped save. he was 52 years old. i tell you this story because chris stevens embodied the best of america. like his fellow foreign service officers, he build bridges across cultures and was deeply invested in the international cooperation that the united nations represents. he acte
to syria, from saudi arabia to libya. he was known for walking the streets of the cities where he worked -- tasting the local food, meeting as many people as he could, speaking arabic, listening with a broad smile. chris went to benghazi in the early days of the libyan revolution, arriving on a cargo ship. as america's representative, he helped the libyan people as they coped with violent conflict, cared for the wounded, and crafted a vision for the future in which the rights of all libyans would be respected. and after the revolution, he supported the birth of a new democracy, as libyans held elections, and built new institutions, and began to move forward after decades of dictatorship. chris stevens loved his work. he took pride in the country he served, and he saw dignity in the people that he met. and two weeks ago, he traveled to benghazi to review plans to establish a new cultural center and modernize a hospital. that's when america's compound came under attack. along with three of his colleagues, chris was killed in the city that he helped to save. he was 52 years old. i tell you
on the jewish vote and the upcoming presidential election. speakers are the former new york city mayor, ed koch, and current new york congressman, bob turner, who holds the seat formerly held by anthony wiener. this was part of an event from last weekend in new york city at the fordham university law school. >> we are here once again for the wine institute in connection with this conference dedicated to examining the 2012 presidential election and the way it is being shapedy the memory of the holocaust and politics there. we could find no two more interesting people to discuss this topic for many reasons. first, the former three term mayor of new york city, ed koch. [applause] people forget, i do not, but people forget that he started out as a congressman. the discussion we are talking about is not merely about his days as mayor, but that he too has run for congress and knows what that means in washington. i think that in his most recent vintage, you can think of him as a king maker, in fighting the jewish vote. many people think of him as a king make -- kingmaker, barometer for where the jewis
how tough the economy is. you're leaving a city that has been bearing some of the brunt. can you talk about that? few dispute that the economy is in a world of hurt? whoever's responsibility that is. >> i think every american would say that the economy is not where we wanted to be. but if you look nationally, there is no question that we have had 30 months of private- sector job growth. 4.6 million new jobs that were created during that time. at the same time, if we were to go right now to the archives of the university and pull out the front page headlines from four years ago and look at what was happening at this 0.4 years ago, where we were losing hundreds of thousands of jobs. in the month when president obama took office, we lost almost 800,000 jobs that month. there was talk of another depression at that time. whether we are talking about taxes or san antonio or anyplace, are we were we want to be? no. but are we better off than where we were? when we're talking about going into another depression and the banks collapsing and so on and so on? absolutely. there is no question in
. >> where is it going to go? >> 30 states, 30 cities. >> this is from politifact. [applause] they checked a romney campaign claim that obama will end welfare work requirements, rating it "pants on fire." that, i believe -- i do not know what that means, but clearly that would be uncomfortable. in reality, the obama administration has said it will consider proposals from states aimed at finding better ways of getting welfare recipients into jobs. factcheck.org and the washington post fact checker have said the same, that the claim is false. [applause] what do you say? >> allow me to respond. >> the truth tour begins tonight. [laughter] >> i should have set that up to point out that the beginning of that was hermann cain maintain the same point the romney campaign had, that the obama administration is getting rid of the work requirement. what i thought that showed was the importance of fact checkers in this campaign. i really think, and brandon and glenn and i were talking about how things are different this time compared to 2008. there is more fact checking than ever, and the fact checking
a discussion on the jewish vote over the weekend. among the speakers, former new york city mayor ed koch who supports president obama. this is an hour and 40 minutes. >> we're here again from the wineman institute in connection to this conference dedicated to the 2012 presidential election and the way it's being shaped by the memory of the holocaust and the politics of israel. we can find no two more interesting people to discuss this topic for many, many reasons. first a former three-term mayor of new york city ed koch. [applause] people forget -- i do not, but people forget that mayor koch actually started as a congressman. so the discussion that we're talking about is not merely about his days as mayor but also he too has run for congress and know what is that means to be in washington. i think in his more recent term, you can thing mayor koch in guiding the king maker in guiding the jewish vote. he may not agree to this but actually many people think to him as a barometer a king maker of sorts of where the jewish vote is headed. that's another reason to have him. he may disown the king-m
from new york city, a look at the jewish vote this year, and after that, a discussion with economic advisers to the obama and romney campaigns. >> i watch c-span every time special events are going on. any time something is going on, i want to watch c-span because they have the best, most unbiased view, so i love c-span. i watched them on -- i watch them on tv or online. i do not know if i have a favorite show. to me, it is just that whenever something is going on, i just know that c-span will have it. >> josh truitt watches cspan. as an's, brought to you public service from your cable provider. >> democrat tim kaine and republican george allen are running for the senate this year. they participated in a debate, moderated by nbc news. >> and good afternoon. welcome to the senatorial debate between democrat tim kaine and republican george allen, hosted by the fairfax county chamber of commerce. i am a moderator of today's event. i want to cover the rules of today's event. it will last one hour and will begin with opening statements, and then the panelists and i will pose questions. t
, 30 cities. [laughter] >> this is from politifact. [applause] they checked a romney campaign claim that obama will end welfare work requirements, rating it "pants on fire." that, i believe -- i do not know what that means, but clearly that would be uncomfortable. in reality, the obama administration has said it will consider proposals from states aimed at finding better ways of getting welfare recipients into jobs. factcheck.org and the washington post fact checker have said the same, that the claim is false. [applause] what do you say? >> allow me to respond. >> the truth tour begins tonight. [laughter] >> i should have set that up to point out that the beginning of that was hermann cain maintain the same point the romney campaign had, that the obama administration is getting rid of the work requirement. what i thought that showed was the importance of fact checkers in this campaign. i really think, and brandon and glenn and i were talking about how things are different this time compared to 2008. there is more fact checking than ever, and the fact checking has a much greater prom
from city to city, talking directly, and i can hear in my home town they will be talking in the next few days, directly to the people, and we need to get the american people alive and alert, because the typical person running for office is gone to do what ever it takes to get their vote. i do not think he has any sense at all that they want this fixed. if we have that at the grass- roots level, he would have these people with different personalities, being reborn, and they would be out on the campaign trail. >> both parties are responsible for our current problems. >> yes. >> governments have lost control of budget, and has waited too long to restructure, but it is not too late. the american people are smarter than most politicians realize. they know we are in trouble. they're willing to accept tough choices as long as they want it to be part of a comprehensive plan that they deemed to be fair. overwhelming support for comprehensive reforms in a range of areas where everything is on the table, minimum support, 76%, up to 100%, based on six key principles that it virtually unanimous s
city. thank you for being with us. guest: good morning to you. host: let me show the viewer is the headline from "the wall street journal." oklahoma challenges of a health law in a new suit. the supreme court had ruled on president obama's health-care law. you filed a new suit. what is it? guest: grendell, we filed an action in january of 2011 -- greta, without an action january of 2011, and a separate action with the proceedings of florida. virginia filed an action as well. 28 states. the focus of the original lawsuit was about the constitutionality of the law and the totality. at that related to the commerce clause, individual mandate. we began the litigation and motions were filed by the government. and in oklahoma, when the case was taken up by the supreme court. as of the decision in june, i filed a motion to lift the stay in oklahoma, the eastern district, asking judge white to consider an amendment. as you know, the original challenge was about constitutionality of the cadets. this is about implementation. this addresses the concerns about the irs a world that was ado
to medical school in these funds cities -- fun cities. do they want to go work in a rural area where they have to deal with higher not practice premiums, bigger overhead costs, practicing out of their area and a broader range of services? there are increasing disincentives for good young doctors to go to rural areas and underserved populations. and now with the way reimbursement is going and with our health care system is, quite frankly, bankert, those disparities are getting worse. -- bankrupt, those disparities are getting worse. i have seen doctors go to a subscription service. people will pay me $1,000 or $2,000 a year and i will go to their house and they will have my number doctors are doing it and it is unfortunately creating a class segregation. host: nancy, your honor with dr. makary. caller: i would like to congratulate c-span, and the one. this transparency in health care is one of the most important things we could ever do. i agree with dr. makary 100%. the transparency in the health- care system right now was not there. and it is the responsibility of a private insurance
to the cities and the lives lost. but both sides reach fatigue, i think neither side is close to that point. i do not see anyone coming to a solution to involving the use of military force to break the belligerence apart. >> i think either side is close to that point of fatigue, and i don't see anyone coming to a solution involving the issue of military force to impose a settlement on the situation. it is going to continue to be ugly for a long time. i can't say how long. two weeks, maybe two years. back in the early '80s, killing 80,000 people, and not giving up allied control of the country. that is what he is facing, not just as personal destiny and his family, but his whole people. >> a grim note. i will open it up to questions from the audience. please put up your hand, and when i recognize you, a microphone will come. the police tell us who you are first and keep your questions brief. >> i'm from the atlantic council. i find it refreshing to tie a middle east discussion without mentioning israel and palestine, but i will muddy the water. i was wondering, what are the long-term implicatio
in new york city about iran. [video clip] >> we cannot forget that not far from here a voice of unspeakable evil and hatred has spoken out, threatening israel and the entire civilized world. we come together knowing that the bitterness of hate is no match for the strength of love. in the weeks ahead, i will continue to speak to these challenges and the opportunities that this moment presents us that go beyond foreign assistance, speaking about the american strategy to secure our interests and ideals in this on certain time. host: laura, pennsylvania, hello. caller: up front i wanted to say, for the first caller that called herself a republican and went on to bash mitt romney, i do not know what you can do, these people are not republicans. if you can ask them who they voted for and they say obama, cut them off. they are lying, they are not republicans. we are talking about who will be the next president for the next four years and the direction this country will go in. foreign policy has become the number-one issue. it used to be the economy, stupid. it is still the economy,
in the next few weeks, hopefully. we just have to be careful. but overall, in the major city there is no problem. but if you travel outside of tripoli, especially if you travel to the south, it is better not to travel by car. there are some security things people have to keep in mind but other -- overall people are anxious. one of the biggest things that made the vivian's angry is the incident that took place that it will drive companies and business away and they had been working very hard to be with the rest of the world. they felt that would be good. >> let's have another round of questions. i think you had your hand up. we have one here. >> the events over the weekend after the death of the embassador, where you have these demonstrations against the militias, one of the results was that some of the leaders said all the weapons had been stolen by demonstrators. these seem to get recycled and out of control again. with the ambassador gone and the cia team out, one of their things was looking for these patents and so on. how you assess the impact of that situation as reducin
is a city called avon lake, and they build ford vans there. there's a ford van plant there. host: would you describe the economy in ohio? caller: oh, it's getting better and better. it's not great, but it's getting better. i forget, they said millions of jobs have been created since obama got into office, and it is getting better. host: next call from michael on our independent line. what do you think about media coverage of campaign 2012? caller: well, i think it's the worst i ever seen. the liberal democrats on msnbc and cnn, they are just covering up for this president. i mean, we had a terrorist attack on the anniversary of 9/11, and this president dropped the ball, him and hillary clinton. they dropped the ball, and they covered it up. we voted for the man the first time. we will not vote for the man this time. he lied about marriage being between a man and a woman, and he stabbed us in the back, and he went with the homosexuals, and that's the one on these networks that are in a frenzy. they're going crazy. they want this man re-elected so he can give them more and more rights. and th
for this edition of the "washington journal." we will see you♪ >> city first of the presidential debates wednesday night live on c-span and online at c-span.org, watch and engage. next on c-span, and national survey on illicit and prescription drug use. followed by a look at the link between national security and childhood obesity. later, and allied campaign rally with vice-president joe biden. he is touring through florida. and a stop in fort myers as part of his swing through the state. join us for live coverage of the vice president at 11:40 a.m. eastern here on c-span. >> every generation in our history has worked and sacrificed to leave a better country to their children or grandchildren and future generations. we were then a spending their money. we are now even more, much more spending their money. and we are leaving them a mess. it will be very difficult to deal with. and if we are about week, just think if -- comes to take us over. the last thing i want to see is our country taken over because we are so financially weak. we are on the edge of the cliff. we have got to start fixi
are pretty conservative voters. the democratic votes tend to be concentrated in the cities like richmond and hampton roads. the democrats tend to win the cities. the battle in virginia tends to be in the suburbs. what you have is a state that is up for grabs. geographically, republican swill win --republicans will win many more counties. host: we're talking about virginia as a battleground state. here are the phone lines. host: who are the people groups that are supporting president obama and mitt romney? guest: 1 you see in virginia is the traditional partisan breakdown. you see a strong gender gap where female voters are much more inclined to support the democratic ticket than the male voters. there have been a lot of controversies in the virginia legislature that the tried to restrict abortion. this was an idea that the government was trying to restrict abortion that caused problems in the last legislative session. with respect to the message that mitt romney has offered, it appeals to more conservatives. virginia has a conservative republican party. mitt romney it may not have been t
at the politics of a city like los angeles, identity is strong. it is a localized phenomenon. stagnation will further deepen those things. one in the difficulties is that republicans really need upward mobility in order to make this and move away from the idea that it is a single issue consistency. another thing about taxes that i mentioned is that this is why i keep thinking about this. i take your point about primaries. tax is a pretty big issue. if you're looking for a candidate who does well, very big constituency. romney is not strongly over performing. you think a tax cut message might resonate. the politics have changed considerably. there are many conservative folks who have talked about the idea and some of calling for marginal tax cuts, why don't you call for a dramatic expansion of the child-care tax credit th. >> some say it barack obama represented the gary hart vote as well as jesse jackson. will you ever have a republican primary candidate who can unite those sensibilities as well? the problem that mitt romney faces is that initially he had a plan that was less have the ca
from 1997 until january 2009. chuck is on the phone, independent line from kansas city. good morning. caller: good morning. i just kind of had a question i'm so tired of government interfering in everything and how come the united states has more people locked nup prison than any other country in the world? i mean, there are good people in there that make mistakes, they're human beings and stuff, and i see it all the time and stuff and they're just trapped. >> host: thank you. we'll get a response. guest: well, most criminal law is state in nature and that's really not -- he is lumping persons who have violated local ordinances, not many of them in jail, persons who have violated state law, and that is a wide array of laws that you can violate. marta, robbery, most of those are state. you have a few federal laws, criminal in nature. and i don't know if he's comparing apples and oranges, if he means -- i'd like to know the violations of state and local, if they have comparable laws in china and russia. i don't know that we fully agree with his analysis that we have the most in jail. i
. in the meantime, i am on the road in a different city between just about every day between now and election day. >> but why can not we have another debate? why not the one in houston? what are you afraid of? >> i am focusing on supporting our campaign. that is what we're doing. i'm listening to the voters of campaign -- tx. >> you can build the support in a debate. >> we agree to this one. look -- i understand you are working very hard to get media coverage. it is not our obligation to help you in that. you can go convey your message to texas voters. i am conveying mine. >> is your obligation to face the voters of texas. >> i am doing that. >> as you said, state by tv, is the critical point. you have had the opportunity. even for the tea party debate, which she would not do. why what he faced me now? >> we are sitting here right now. you can launch every attack you want to right now, on television. an unscripted, moderated format -- this is an unscripted. >> you will not face me six times. >> maybe you could actually respond. you are facing right now. attack me however you like. and wes move fo
, and how many more cities do you have? >> i think i am at c-span, but it is a little confusing. tomorrow we will be in richmond, virginia. then in the evening i will be in norfolk. monday night we will be of virginia tech, which is very interesting, going back to the scene of the massacre. i will be speaking there. 32 people were killed there. one dog of the victim's -- one of the victims was shot four times. i am interested in interviewing a professor there. then we are on to colorado for the big debate. we are both speaking on the silent majority, election 2012 tour, but also, we do this daily, radio and television broadcast that airs on over 1100 stations, so we have to do the broadcast wherever we are. being on the scene has been remarkable. i will give you one example. we last week were in freeport, ill., and we got a broadcaster rai, and we went to the stephensons their ground -- broadcast truck, and we went to the stephensons fairground, which happens to be owned by bain capital. and the workers across the street are camping out because the technology company is closing up shop and t
thank you so much for coming in and talking with us from new york city. >> my pleasure. thank you for having me. >> we have been looking at this new report. we now go to the floor of the house of representatives. it is a prof forma session the speaker pro tempore: the house will be in order. the chair lays before the house a communication from the speaker. the clerk: the speaker's rooms, washington, d.c. october 2, 2012. i hereby appoint the honorable rob woodall to act as speaker pro tempore on this day. signed, john a. boehner, speaker of the house of representatives. the speaker pro tempore: the prayer will be offered today by our chaplain, father conroy. chaplain conroy: let us pray. eternal god we give you thanks for giving us another day. we thank you once again that we your creatures can come before you and ask guidance for the men and women of this assembly. send your spirit of peace, honesty, and fairness during these weeks of political campaign. may their ears and hearts be opened to listen to the hopes and needs of those whom they represent and whom they seek to represe
in 1966 when the city of san francisco said it would not fund social-service agencies, including catholic charities that did not provide health-care benefits to domestic partners. the catholic archbishop of san francisco, no liberal, he wound up succeeding rep singer for the congregation of the doctrine of the faith. but they came to a compromise designate anyone legally domiciled in the residence as a health-care co beneficiary. be that person a child, a parent, an aunt, a close friend or a gay and lesbian partner. the archbishop argued the catholic church was always in favor of increasing health-care insurance coverage and this was a way to do it, even though there would be this other factor involved. in my judgment, the second set of rules from the obama administration proposes compromise which in its own way tries to respect the freedom and rights of all parties involved. thank you. [applause] >> thank you and good evening. i'm here representing more than 120,000 women who live paycheck to paycheck, his struggle to get by, who are on 75 and the height of traffic with their check in ji
with the ads on both sides, and city have been misleading and in some cases just not true. does that disturb you? some of them are your ads. >> do you see sometimes us going overboard in our campaign, mistakes that are made? areas where there is no doubt somebody could dispute how we are presenting things? that happens in politics. people't the american entitled to the truth? >> the truth of the matter is that most of the time we're having a vigorous debate about our visions for the country. there is a lot at stake in this election, so is it going to be sharp sometimes? absolutely. people have a good sense of where i want to take the country, where governor romney -- >> so there you have the president saying, well, do we go overboard and make mistakes, that happens. yesterday, cnn was pressing mitt romney on the welfare matter. he made the statement that, well, whenever we have made mistakes or false claims, we have corrected them. are any of you aware of any corrective ads the romney campaign -- the romney campaign was not even when cnn pressed them for examples. they have not corrected any
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27